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types of teeth

The 5 Types of Teeth

Did you know that the 32 different teeth in your mouth come in all shapes and sizes? The various tooth types help you to properly eat food, but it’s important to remember that each one has its own maintenance needs. Keep reading to learn all about the different types of teeth and see how you should clean them.

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How to Pack a Mouth-Healthy Lunch for Work

How to Pack a Mouth-Healthy Lunch for Work

If you usually have a sandwich and a bag of chips for your work lunch washed down with a soda, you are not likely to be doing either your general or your mouth health much good. Why not swap out some of the more harmful ingredients of your lunch for some nutritious and tasty replacements that care for your body and your mouth?

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biorepair

Pros and Cons of BioRepair Toothpaste

BioRepair toothpaste uses a formula that aims to remineralize and restore the health of your teeth. It contains hydroxyapatite which is similar to enamel. When the toothpaste is scrubbed against your teeth, the hydroxyapatite clings to them. Because it's similar to enamel and dentin, it can protect the surface of your teeth from damage.

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Is It Possible To Restore Tooth Enamel?

Is It Possible To Restore Tooth Enamel?

One of the scariest things your dentist can tell you is that your tooth enamel is damaged. Once your enamel is damaged, you can quickly fall prey to things like gum disease, cavities, and tooth loss. You may also notice an increase in your sensitivity. Those who experience tooth enamel damage may wonder if it's possible to restore your enamel. Here's everything you need to know about whether or not it's possible to restore your tooth enamel.

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Is baking Soda Safe for Teeth?

Why Use Organic Toothpaste?

RDA VALUES FOR BRUSHING YOUR TEETH WITHOUT DAMAGE TO GUMS AND/OR ENAMEL

Most toothpaste on the market contains abrasive particles (i.e. particles which are not water-soluble) including aluminum hydroxide, silicates and others. Such "scrubbing" compounds are added to help remove plaque and stains during brushing, and it's their quantity, particulate size and hardness which determine the degree of abrasiveness of a toothpaste.

To be able to measure a toothpaste abrasiveness, scientists use the RDA index (from radioactive dentin abrasion or relative dentin abrasion). Higher values indicating increasingly higher abrasiveness. The more abrasive power, the more likely enamel erosion will occur, which can easily open the way to tooth decay.   It's typically whitening toothpastes which top the list of abrasiveness while toothpastes formulated for sensitive teeth tend to be at the bottom.

 

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